2

He Sat There Like an Unfeeling Lump Until the Nobel Prize Was Mentioned

“We cannot find a safe place to live… [ISIS] killed my mom. They killed my six brothers. They left behind them.”
— Yazidi activist and Nobel Prize winner Nadia Murad, to Trump in Oval Office

“Where are they now?”
— Trump

“They killed them. They are in the mass grave in Sinjar and I’m still fighting just to live safe in safety. Please do something.”
— Murad

“I know the area very well. We’re going to look into it very strongly…You had the Nobel Prize? That’s incredible. They gave it to you for what reason? Maybe you can explain.”
— Trump

“For what reason?…I didn’t give up. I make it clear to everyone that ISIS raped thousands of Yazidi women.”
— Murad

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1

So, Tell Me. What Do These Two Contribute?

From the Washington Post:

As the uproar over President Trump’s racist remarks demanding four minority Democratic lawmakers “go back [to countries] from which they came” continued to flare Tuesday, the White House prepared to roll out a plan that would detail the type of immigrants the administration wants to admit to the United States. 

That interruption Tuesday is far from the only obstacle White House will face this year as it tries to generate momentum for its new immigration plan, which aims to reorient the current legal immigration system to one based primarily on an immigrant’s ability to contribute to the economy, rather than on family ties.

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Melania Trump’s parents, Amalija Knavs and “Trump stunt double” Viktor Knavs

1

The Height of Cheapness

From The Washington Post:

President Trump has agreed to shut down his embattled personal charity and give away its remaining funds amid allegations that he used it for his personal and political benefit, the New York attorney general announced Tuesday.

The Post’s reporting showed that, for years, Trump appeared to treat the foundation — which was, by law, an independent entity — as a checkbook for gifts that bolstered his interests.

The largest donation in the foundation’s history — a $264,231 gift to the Central Park Conservancy in 1989 — appeared to benefit Trump’s business: it paid to restore a fountain outside Trump’s Plaza Hotel. The smallest, a $7 foundation gift to the Boy Scouts that same year, appeared to benefit Trump’s family. It matched the amount required to enroll a boy in the Scouts the year that his son Donald Trump Jr. was 11.

 

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